Rain gardens

Rain gardens help to clean and filter stormwater. Our urban areas have lots of hard surfaces like roofs, driveways, roads and carparks. When it rains, water carries litter, leaves, silt, oils and nutrients that can pollute our waterways.

Rain gardens help clean the stormwater and allow a little to soak into the ground. The litter and leaves stay at the surface to break down or be collected later. Silt and oils are trapped in the soil where microbes break them down over time. Nutrients are used by the plants for growth and keep them happy.

As well as providing stormwater treatment, rain gardens create green space and reduce urban heat island effects.

Rain gardens can be all shapes and sizes. You can build them in to new developments, retrofit them into parks and verges or build them straight into the road.

There are lots of different plants you can use in a rain garden. In the City of Charles Sturt we use:

  • Atriplex Semibaccata (Australian Saltbush)
  • Juncus Pallidus (Great soft-rush)
  • Carex Appressa (Tall Sedge)
  • Lomandra Longifolia (Spiny-head mat-rush)

We have rain gardens at:

  • Ross Avenue Reserve
  • Hartley Road and Jarman Ave

Tracey Avenue Stormwater Catchment

The Tracey Avenue stormwater catchment is a network of streetscape rain gardens. It was constructed in 2015.

The rain gardens filter stormwater, reducing the amount of pollutants reaching the River Torrens and Gulf St Vincent. It also helps to improve the health of street side vegetation and beautify the street with green space.

On the map below, the Tracey Avenue stormwater catchment is outlined in red. Rainfall flows into a network of underground stormwater drainage pipes shown in blue.

Tracey Avenue stormwater catchment map

More Information

Water Business Unit Coordinator
8408 1111
council@charlessturt.sa.gov.au